This Toledo TV Station Is Set For Out-Of-State Control

By on Nov, 30 2016 with Comments 2

In a move designed “to improve both the news product and product efficiencies,” the master control for Sinclair Broadcast Group‘s NBC affiliate in Toledo, Ohio — WNWO-24 — will soon be handled by staff at the company’s CBS affiliate in South Bend, Ind. — WSBT-22.

Specifically, WSBT will take over master control for WNWO by which content is readied for broadcast and commercials are inserted.

WSBT will also handle all of the technical aspects of WNWO’s newscasts, although all of the local news content will continue to be covered by local reporters and will be produced in Toledo.

The shift is expected to take place during Q1 2017.

WNWO airs local news in morning drive, prior to the TODAY show, and in evenings and late nights.

Sinclair VP/News Scott Livingston explained, “Sinclair’s investments in technology have made it possible for newscasts to be produced in a more efficient fashion, and allow us to continue to provide local news to the community which in the past would not have been possible. WNWO appreciates the community support during the past 50 years and will remain a strong voice in Toledo and committed to our local communities.”

About The Author: Adam R Jacobson is a veteran radio industry journalist and advertising industry analyst with general, multicultural and Hispanic market expertise. From 1996 to 2006 he served as an editor at Radio & Records.

  1. Scott Gilbert Says:

    “to improve both the news product and product efficiencies,” Or, in other words, to cut costs and increase profits. As far as efficiency, I’ve read stories in the trades about how remote master controls can really screw up. Good luck, Toledo!

    • We report, you decide. The quote is a bit nauseating to read, but it’s there for a reason and you got it, Scott! I have seen remote-controlled newsrooms in small markets, and it can work just fine. But the sad fact is jobs are lost as a result, and that is never a good thing for an industry that in five years will be more imperiled than radio. Consolidation in local TV is coming — look at Hawaii News Now, and the combination with Fox 29 and WPTV-5 in my home market of West Palm Beach. This will be more common in 2022, while we will see a shrinking in the number of pay-TV (cable) channels as there are simply too many, with great content spread out across an impossibly huge array of sources rendering some “premium tier” cable channels worthless. When what happened in Toledo hits WLS-7, with master control out of WABC-7, then we know we have a big ticking timebomb for broadcast TV that is ready to explode

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