In-feed sponsored content success rely on brand familiarity, trust, more

By on Jul, 24 2014 with Comments 0

IAB / Interactive Advertising BureauA new comprehensive study of U.S. online news users by the Interactive Advertising Bureau and Edelman Berland shows that relevancy (90%) is the top factor in sparking interest in in-feed sponsored content, yet it also clearly demonstrates that the public’s feelings about the advertiser itself determines the success of this type of native advertising. Criteria such as brand familiarity and trust (81%), as well as subject matter expertise (82%), were identified as critical in driving news reading consumers’ interest in sponsored content.

Preconceived opinions about a publisher are also an important part of the equation, with the research showing that a positive view of a news site’s credibility can significantly impact readers’ feelings about sponsored content – sparking a 33 percent uptick in perceived credibility of the ad’s content.

Good storytelling was also singled out as a key part of the mix. Nearly two-thirds (60%) of online news visitors said that they are more open to digital advertising that focuses on a story rather than selling a product.

“This new study shows that in-feed sponsored content can be a win for brands and publishers both, when consumers’ viewpoints are taken into account,” said Sherrill Mane, Senior Vice President, Research, Analytics and Measurement, IAB. “News publishers get greater impact when they work with familiar and trusted brands. By the same token, marketers see greater lift when publishers are perceived by consumers as credible news outlets. There are a myriad of other issues at play too, so it is incumbent upon everyone involved to understand key criteria when agreeing to a native advertising campaign.”

Drilling down into specific news verticals – business, entertainment and general news – revealed differences in each news user group’s perception of sponsored content. For example, when asked to look at real-world mockups of news pages, most business and entertainment news audiences (82% and 85% respectively) felt that in-feed sponsored content was easy to single out, while the general news audience had more trouble, with less than half (41%) recognizing that the material was advertising.

General news audiences continued to be an outlier throughout the research, but when handled correctly, the study finds that sponsored content can offer a strong upside for both marketer and publisher across all three verticals. More than half of business and entertainment news users surveyed stated that sponsored content has the potential to increase the favorability of a brand advertiser and news site across a variety of dimensions. A similar response is also possible with the general news audience, but it seems that they have a higher bar for in-feed sponsored content in order to boost their approval of a marketer or publisher.

“We already knew from click-through rates and other metrics that sponsored content, or native advertising, has performed well compared to other display ads,” said Steve Rubel, Chief Content Strategist, Edelman. “But, with these findings, we’ve now uncovered how consumers really feel about this content – and are able to provide insights into what it will take for brands and publishers to succeed when it comes to this form of native advertising.”

“In-depth consumer research, such as this, will ultimately benefit advertisers, publishers and consumers alike,” said Ari Lewine, Co-Founder and Chief Strategy Officer of TripleLift, which served as the sponsor of the study. “It’s essential to have objective research on consumers’ viewpoints, and that’s why TripleLift supported this endeavor.”

 

Filed Under Broadcast News Internet

About The Author: Carl has been with RBR-TVBR since 1997 and is currently Managing Director/Senior Editor. Residing in Northern Virginia, he covers the business of broadcasting, advertising, programming, new media and engineering. He’s also done a great deal of interviews for the company and handles our ever-growing stable of bylined columnists.

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