Competing media: vehicle wraps

By on Sep, 2 2014 with Comment 1

Car RadioLocal radio and television stations don’t need additional competition, but it keeps coming anyway. One of them from the outdoor category, is vehicle wrapping. But this is one that local broadcasters, particularly on the radio side, may be able to use to their own advantage.

Advice of using vehicle wraps, said to be an increasingly popular option for a wide variety of businesses, comes from JMR Graphics.

JMR offers simple rules to make a vehicle wrap campaign work. Plan for a mere six-seconds worth of attention from drivers seeing the message; use big letters; and use contrasting colors.

Whatever message you choose to convey, make sure some thought goes into it. JMR’s TJ Panell said, “So many firms slap together shoddy work, with a weak message and low quality graphic, just to get their point across instead of taking the time to understand these small details that derive from consumer psychology.  When you understand the basis, you can build off of it, ending up with a much better end product.”

RBR-TVBR observation: If we were a broadcast corporate marketing exec, we’d give this medium some serious thought, not as a threat to our bottom line, but as an effective promotional technique for our own stations.

Television stations could use cars that are part of the traffic mix in afternoon drive to promote early and late evening news, popular syndicated programming or access a station provides to key local sports teams.

For radio, the opportunity is even better. It’s the perfect point-of-purchase place to trumpet your station and tell drivers to go there immediately. Think a car festooned with the message “Challenging Commute? Traffic and Weather on the Sevens at W-NEWs 105.5” might get a harried commuter’s attention?
We might consider testing this out in some of our markets – put it in the promo budget and see what happens.

About The Author: RBR+TVBR has been reporting on the business of broadcasting for nearly three decades. Beholden to no one, it is independently owned.

  1. Funny! The first time I every saw or heard of vehicle wrapping was on a radio station van years ago.